Our Community Calendar is a resource we offer to all qualified nonprofits. Community Calendar events are highlighted live, on-air throughout the day on KCPW. Featured events are chosen at random. You will also find all current Community Calendar events listed here at kcpw.org.

PLEASE NOTE: Our Community Calendar now also has a physical home. Following the criteria listed below, bring professional materials (no handwritten signs please) promoting your event to the KCPW studios at 210 East 400 South, Suite 10. We’ll happily hang them in our window for all Library Square traffic to see.

To submit an event to the Community Calendar, the event must meet the following criteria:

  • The event must take place in Utah.
  • The organization promoting the event  must be a qualified 501 (c) (3) charity or political subdivision.
  • The event cannot promote a religious organization or individual.

If your event meets these criteria, click “Post Your Event” below. Include your contact information in case we have any questions. Otherwise, your event may not get published.

KCPW would like to encourage you to make the most of your post by adding a featured image and links to your organization.  Utilize the provided field boxes (i.e. location, ticket information) to display information as accurately and quickly as possible.  Please do not submit duplicate postings for the same event.

Please submit requests at least 10-14 days before your event – event listings read  on-air are chosen at random, at least two weeks prior to the event.

If you are posting a class or workshop that requires registration, list just the first instance in the date and time, and include the details for subsequent classes in the description.

 

Sep
26
Wed
The Future of Conservation in America: A Chart for Rough Water @ University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law
Sep 26 @ 12:15 pm – 1:15 pm
The Future of Conservation in America: A Chart for Rough Water @ University of Utah S.J. Quinney College of Law |  |  |

This is a turbulent time for the conservation of America’s natural and cultural heritage. From the current assaults on environmental protection to the threats of climate change, biodiversity loss, and disparity of environmental justice, the challenges facing the conservation movement are both immediate and long term. In this time of uncertainty, we need a clear and compelling guide for the future of conservation in America; a declaration to inspire the next generation of conservation leaders. This is that guide—what the authors describe as “a chart for rough water.” Written by the first scientist appointed as science advisor to the director of the National Park Service and the eighteenth director of the National Park Service, this is a candid, passionate, and ultimately hopeful book. The authors describe a unified vision of conservation that binds nature protection, historical preservation, sustainability, public health, civil rights and social justice, and science into common cause—and offer real-world strategies for progress. To be read, pondered, debated, and often revisited, The Future of Conservation in America is destined to be a touchstone for the conservation movement in the decades ahead.

Sep
29
Sat
Community Meet-up at Spiral Jetty with UMFA @ Spiral Jetty
Sep 29 @ 12:00 pm – 4:00 pm
Community Meet-up at Spiral Jetty with UMFA @ Spiral Jetty |  |  |

Adventure with UMFA and Great Salt Lake Institute for a fun day at Spiral Jetty. Friends of all ages are welcome to create art, learn about the science of the lake, and explore the landscape. We’ll meet at Spiral Jetty on Rozel Point in Great Salt Lake. Directions are at www.umfa.utah.edu/index.php/spiral-jetty

Public lecture on “Every Last Drop:Climate Change Jeopardizes Utah’s Water Security” @ Salt Lake City Library, Nancy Tessman Auditorium
Sep 29 @ 2:00 pm
Public lecture on "Every Last Drop:Climate Change Jeopardizes Utah's Water Security" @ Salt Lake City Library, Nancy Tessman Auditorium |  |  |

Presentation by Brian McInerney, U.S. Weather Service describing the consequences of climate change on future water resources in Utah.

Oct
5
Fri
Julia Corbett reads and signs OUT OF THE WOODS: SEEING NATURE IN THE EVERYDAY! Part of UHBF @ Weller Book Works
Oct 5 @ 7:00 pm
Julia Corbett reads and signs OUT OF THE WOODS: SEEING NATURE IN THE EVERYDAY! Part of UHBF @ Weller Book Works |  |  |

Please join us on October 5th as we welcome Julia Corbett for a reading and signing of OUT OF THE WOODS: SEEING NATURE IN THE EVERYDAY!

Have you ever wondered about society’s desire to cultivate the perfect lawn, why we view some animals as “good” and some as “bad,” or even thought about the bits of nature inside everyday items—toothbrushes, cell phones, and coffee mugs? In this fresh and introspective collection of essays, Julia Corbett examines nature in our lives with all of its ironies and contradictions by seamlessly integrating personal narratives with morsels of highly digestible science and research. Each story delves into an overlooked aspect of our relationship with nature—insects, garbage, backyards, noise, open doors, animals, and language—and how we cover our tracks.

With a keen sense of irony and humor and an awareness of the miraculous in the mundane, Corbett recognizes the contradictions of contemporary life. She confronts the owner of a high-end market who insists on keeping his doors open in all temperatures, and takes us on a trip to a new mall with a replica of a trout stream that once flowed nearby. The phrase “out of the woods” guides us through layers of meaning to a contemplation of grief, remembrance, and resilience.

OUT OF THE WOODS leads to surprising insights into the products, practices, and phrases we take for granted in our everyday encounters with nature and encourages us all to consider how we might revalue or reimagine our relationships with nature in our everyday lives.

Julia Corbett is a professor in the Department of Communication and the Environmental Humanities Graduate Program at the University of Utah in Salt Lake City. She authored one of the first texts in environmental communication, Communicating Nature: How We Create and Understand Environmental Messages. Her second book, Seven Summers: A Naturalist Homesteads in the Modern West, “enacts the insights of feminist nature criticism” in a memoir about a small cabin in a wild place in a twenty-first-century landscape under acute pressure; it was short-listed for the Reading the West Award. Her environmental nonfiction essays have been published in venues such as Orion, High Country News, and Camas. Before receiving her MA and PhD at the University of Minnesota in 1994, she was a newspaper reporter, a park ranger, a naturalist, a natural resources information officer, and a deputy press secretary. She summers in the mountains of western Wyoming in her cabin. For more information, visit juliacorbett.net.

Part of Utah Humanities Book Festival!

Oct
8
Mon
Susan Purvis reading and signing for GO FIND: MY JOURNEY TO FIND THE LOST – AND MYSELF. Part of UHBF @ Weller Book Works
Oct 8 @ 6:30 pm
Susan Purvis reading and signing for GO FIND: MY JOURNEY TO FIND THE LOST - AND MYSELF. Part of UHBF @ Weller Book Works |  |  |

Please join us on October 8th for an evening with Susan Purvis as she reads and signs GO FIND: MY JOURNEY TO FIND THE LOST – AND MYSELF! Part of Utah Humanities Book Festival!

Accompanied by her rebellious black Lab, Tasha, maverick Susan Purvis navigates her way through both deep snow and challenging relationships to find passion and purpose as she and Tasha learn to save lives in the Colorado mountains.

Somewhere between hunting for gold in Latin America as a geologist and marriage to a new husband, 33-year-old Susan Purvis loses her way.

Susan comes to believe that a puppy and working on ski patrol at the last great ski town in Colorado will improve her life. When she learns about avalanches that bury people without warning, she challenges herself: “What if I teach a dog to save lives?” This quest propels her to train the best possible search dog, vowing to never leave anyone behind.

With no clue how to care for a houseplant, let alone a dog, she chooses five-week-old Labrador retriever, Tasha. With the face of a baby bear and the temperament of an NFL linebacker, Tasha constantly tests Susan’s determination to transform her into a rescue dog. Susan and Tasha jockey for alpha position as they pursue certification in avalanche, water, and wilderness recovery. Susan eventually learns to truly communicate with Tasha by seeing the world through her dog’s nose.

As the first female team in a male-dominated search and rescue community, they face resistance at every turn. They won’t get paid even a bag of kibble for their efforts, yet they launch dozens of missions to rescue the missing or recover the remains of victims of nature and crime.

Training with Tasha in the field to find, recover and rescue the lost became Susan’s passion. But it was also her circumstance—she was in many ways as lost as anyone she ever pulled out of an avalanche or found huddled in the woods. “Lostness” doesn’t only apply to losing the trail. People can get lost in a relationship, a business or a life. Susan was convinced that only happened to other people until Tasha and a life in the mountains taught her otherwise.

Susan Purvis is a Lead Instructor with Wilderness Medical Associates and the American Institute for Avalanche Research and Education (AIARE). She is a professional member of the American Avalanche Association (AAA), the Explorers Club, and a Wilderness Medical Society member. Since 1998, Susan has owned and operated Crested Butte Outdoors International, based in Whitefish, Montana (www.cboutdoors.com). Her mission is to teach students how to think critically in unconventional settings.

Oct
9
Tue
Natural History through Literature: Nature, Love, Medicine @ Southern Utah University
Oct 9 @ 4:00 pm
Natural History through Literature: Nature, Love, Medicine @ Southern Utah University |  |  |

Join editor Thomas Lowe Fleischner and contributor Jana Richman at Southern Utah University at 4:00 p.m. for a discussion about natural history and Nature, Love, Medicine: Essays on Wildness and Wellness.

Count the petals of a globe mallow flower or listen for the whir of a black-chinned hummingbird and you’ve practiced natural history, connecting to a source of healing and connection that can be accessed by everyone. In Nature, Love, Medicine, ecologists and educators, poets and artists, and healers and the healed explore the notion that practicing attentive natural history remains an essential pathway to wellness, for individuals and societies.

https://www.facebook.com/events/233956027431629/

Desert Cabal Discussion with Amy Irvine @ Back of Beyond Books
Oct 9 @ 7:00 pm
Desert Cabal Discussion with Amy Irvine @ Back of Beyond Books |  |  |

Join author Amy Irvine at Moab’s beloved Back of Beyond Books for a reading and discussion on her latest book, Desert Cabal.

Ed Abbey’s Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness turns 50 this fall, and its iconic author, who has inspired generations of rebel-rousing advocacy on behalf of the American West, is due for a tribute as well as a talking to. In Desert Cabal: A New Season in the Wilderness, Amy Irvine admires the man who influenced her life and work while challenging all that is dated—offensive, even—between the covers of Abbey’s environmental classic. Irvine names and questions the “lone male” narrative—white and privileged as it is—that still has its boots planted firmly at the center of today’s wilderness movement, even as she celebrates the lens through which Abbey taught so many to love the wild remains of the nation. From Abbey’s quiet notion of solitude to Irvine’s roaring cabal, the desert just got hotter, and its defenders more nuanced and numerous.

Oct
11
Thu
Natural History through Literature: Nature, Love, Medicine @ Utah Valley University
Oct 11 @ 1:00 pm
Natural History through Literature: Nature, Love, Medicine @ Utah Valley University |  |  |

Join editor Thomas Lowe Fleischner and contributors Jana Richman and Nalini Nadkarni at UVU for a discussion about Nature, Love, Medicine: Essays on Wildness and Wellness.

Count the petals of a globe mallow flower or listen for the whir of a black-chinned hummingbird and you’ve practiced natural history, connecting to a source of healing and connection that can be accessed by everyone. In Nature, Love, Medicine, ecologists and educators, poets and artists, and healers and the healed explore the notion that practicing attentive natural history remains an essential pathway to wellness, for individuals and societies.

Nature Love Medicine & Finding Stillness in a Noisy World @ The King's English Bookshop
Oct 11 @ 7:00 pm
Nature Love Medicine & Finding Stillness in a Noisy World @ The King's English Bookshop |  |  |

In “Nature, Love, Medicine,” a diverse array of nearly two dozen writers—including psychologists, poets, biologists, teachers, and artists—share personal stories which urge and inspire readers to pay conscious, careful attention to the world, and remind natural scientists of the power that their work has to invigorate our core humanity and heal us as individuals.

Three contributors—including the collection’s editor—to “Nature, Love, Medicine: Essays on Wildness and Wellness ” will be at the King’s English Bookshop for a book talk, Q&A, and signing on “Nature, Love, Medicine” and Jana Richman’s new collection of essays “Finding Stillness in a Noisy World.”

Thomas Lowe Fleischner is a naturalist and conservation biologist, and founding director of the Natural History Institute, and Faculty Emeritus at Prescott College, where he taught interdisciplinary environmental studies for almost three decades. He edited “The Way of Natural History,” and authored “Singing Stone: A Natural History of the Escalante Canyons and Desert Wetlands.”

Nalini Nadkarni is a forest ecologist who pioneered techniques for studying tree canopy communities in tropical and temperate forests, and is the author of “Between Earth and Sky: Our Intimate Connections to Trees,” and other books. She is a professor of biology at the University of Utah.

Jana Richman is the author of a memoir, “Riding in the Shadows of Saints: A Woman’s Story of Motorcycling the Mormon Trail,” and two novels: “The Last Cowgirl” and “The Ordinary Truth.”

“Nature, Love, Medicine” and “Finding Stillness in a Noisy World” are available to buy at The King’s English Bookshop: https://www.kingsenglish.com/

Oct
17
Wed
Unique Stories of the Yellowstone Wolf Reintroduction @ Salt Lake City Main Library Room C
Oct 17 @ 7:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Unique Stories of the Yellowstone Wolf Reintroduction @ Salt Lake City Main Library Room C |  |  |

Our guest presenter for the Wasatch Packtivists meeting is Lynn Weston, a naturalist with extensive experience teaching at the Yellowstone Forever Institute beginning in 2000. Lynn will present “Unique Stories of the Yellowstone Wolf Reintroduction.” The return of wolves to Yellowstone is clearly one of the most dramatic events in ecological history, but there are many personal, unique and unknown stories during that time that are truly captivating and exciting. Prepare for some surprises as we explore these stories surrounding the reintroduction and issues regarding the Crystal Creek acclamation pen during 1995. Lynn is currently working with an YF Institute class entitled “Wolves: Mythology and Reality.” Lynn became involved in the wolf Environmental Impact Statement in 1994 and was one of the first to assist the researchers and biologists in wolf location, pack behavior, and wolf dynamics in 1996. When not in Yellowstone, Lynn volunteers at the Ogden Nature Center assisting with school programs in field ecology and recently developed a docent program. Free and open to the public.

Oct
22
Mon
Desert Cabal Discussion with Amy Irvine @ Utah Valley University
Oct 22 @ 2:00 pm – 5:00 pm
Desert Cabal Discussion with Amy Irvine @ Utah Valley University  |  |  |

Come grab your copy of Desert Cabal!

Edward Abbey’s Desert Solitaire: A Season in the Wilderness turns 50 this fall, and is due for a celebration and a talking to. In Desert Cabal, Amy Irvine helps to make contemporary the dated, white male narrative that is still very much at the heart of today’s wilderness movement—even as she celebrates the lens through which Abbey taught so many to love the wild remains of the nation. From a quiet solitude to a roaring cabal, Ed Abbey has met his match in Amy Irvine.

Mostly White Discussion with Alison Hart @ Salt Lake City Public Library
Oct 22 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Mostly White Discussion with Alison Hart @ Salt Lake City Public Library |  |  |

Alison Hart discusses her new book, Mostly White, a story that spans four generations of a mixed-race family. This book is a powerful tale of inter-generational trauma and the healing brought by wildness, music, and the resilience of women. From Emma, who survives the abuse of an Indian Residential school in 1890s Maine, to Ella, who navigates color lines in 1980s New York City, Alison Hart’s unforgettable characters fight to form their own identities and honor the call of their ancestors.

Alison Hart studied theater at New York University and later found her voice as a writer. She identifies as a mixed-race African American, Passamaquoddy Native American, Irish, Scottish, and English woman of color. Her poetry collection Temp Words was published by Cosmo Press in 2015, and her poems appear in Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California (Scarlet Tanager Books, 2016) and elsewhere.

For more information on this event, please visit: https://bit.ly/2MkVAkk

This event is made possible with support from the Torrey House Press, The City Library, and Utah Humanities.